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Richard Kujur

Video-journalist. Storyteller. Motion Designer 
A storyteller at heart, I have produced multiple documentaries, explainers and news reports on topics like society, culture, gender, geo-politics and environment which has been published on various platforms.

Published by

 Deutsche Welle, Scroll.in, The Hindu, The Quint, Unscripted News,
The Reporters Collective, The Diplomat Magazine, StoriesAsia, Newsreel.Asia
Eco India: How shrimp is being farmed in Punjab, miles away from the coastline
11:40

Eco India: How shrimp is being farmed in Punjab, miles away from the coastline

Every week, Eco India brings you stories that inspire you to build a cleaner, greener and better tomorrow. Around the world irrigation, drought and sea level rise are increasing the salinity of the soil – and stunting crop productivity. One of India’s worst affected states is Punjab, known as the country’s granary. There, the problem is compounded by waterlogging. To help maintain farmers' livelihoods, scientists are replacing wheat fields with ponds, to farm an animal normally found hundreds of kilometers away – in the sea. CREDITS: Supervising Producer: Nooshin Mowla Script: Jessica Goel, Nooshin Mowla Field Producer: Jessica Goel Video Editor: Richard Kujur Associate Producer: Ipsita Basu Director of Photography: Richard Kujur Executive Producer: Sannuta Raghu ********** Eco India is a co-production between DW and Scroll.in. You can watch the full episodes on https://scroll.in/topic/56120/eco-india Join the discussion here - https://www.facebook.com/groups/ecoindia/ Subscribe to get the latest episodes of Eco India - https://bit.ly/2M9WTXn For more explainers, and the web’s most interesting videos - https://scroll.in/video/ For the latest news and analysis - https://scroll.in Support our award-winning journalism by making a financial contribution towards the Scroll Ground Reporting Fund - https://scroll.in/contribute Follow Scroll.in here - Facebook: https://facebook.com/scroll.in/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/scroll_in Instagram: https://instagram.com/scroll_in/ Mastodon: https://masthead.social/@Scroll
75 years of Independence: the India story | The Hindu
10:04

75 years of Independence: the India story | The Hindu

Seventy-five years ago, India gained Independence from British rule and went on to become one of the largest democracies in the world In January 1950, India became a republic. While this was much to celebrate, the India that Prime Minister Jawaharlal Nehru inherited was that of an economy battered by colonial exploitation and the horrors of partition. The only way for the country, was up. Well, literally For a country that started its space program with rocket parts being transported to the launch site on a bicycle and ox carts, it now plans to send humans to space. We go down memory lane, tracing India’s progress in various fields. Production: Richard Kujur Scripting: Gayatri Menon and Kanishkaa Balachandran Voiceover: Rajashree Das Thank you for watching our video! You can subscribe to our channel here: https://bit.ly/3c8Adi6 Visit https://www.thehindu.com/ for the latest updates, analysis, opinions, and more. You can also download our apps: Android: https://bit.ly/3nboBEi iOs: https://apple.co/3EDCwt4 The Hindu is committed to keeping you up-to-date with information on the developments in India and the world. We promise to deliver quality journalism that stays away from vested interest and political propaganda. You can support us by subscribing to our digital offerings here: https://bit.ly/3emywiz Follow us: Twitter: https://twitter.com/the_hindu Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/the_hindu/ #IndependenceDay #15august #indianhistory
Dr. Dilip Mahalanabis and the discovery of ORS | The Hindu
04:00

Dr. Dilip Mahalanabis and the discovery of ORS | The Hindu

On 16th December 1971, East Pakistan was liberated, forming what we know today as Bangladesh. Following the war, nearly 10 million people took refuge in India. But as the monsoon arrived, with heavy rains and floods, also came cholera. With a lack of access to food, clean water and sanitation, the cholera epidemic killed over 5,000 people in the refugee camps alone. In one such refugee camp at Bangaon in West Bengal, the situation was turning critical. The camp was running out of saline fluid, a standard treatment for cholera in those days. The clock was ticking fast as hundreds more awaited treatment. Dr Dilip Mahalnabis, a Kolkata-based paediatrician, stepped in. From his research, he knew that a solution of sugar and salt, which would increase water absorption by the body, could save lives. He turned to Oral Rehydration Therapy, an unpopular treatment for diarrhoea in those days. Against the odds, and with the help of Johns Hopkins University, he began giving out a mixture of table salt, baking soda and glucose with clean drinking water. He and his team then prepared and stored the solution in large drums, from where patients or their relatives could help themselves. In the next 14 days, the number of deaths declined from 30 per cent to 3.6 per cent in the refugee camps. We look at Dr Mahalanabis’s contribution to the field of health and his awards and recognition. Script and production: Richard Kujur #ors #ORT #dilipmahalanobis #cholera #oralrehydrationtherapy Thank you for watching our video! You can subscribe to our channel here: https://bit.ly/3c8Adi6 Visit https://www.thehindu.com/ for the latest updates, analysis, opinions, and more. You can also download our apps: Android: https://bit.ly/3nboBEi iOs: https://apple.co/3EDCwt4 The Hindu is committed to keeping you up-to-date with information on the developments in India and the world. We promise to deliver quality journalism that stays away from vested interest and political propaganda. You can support us by subscribing to our digital offerings here: https://bit.ly/3emywiz Follow us: Twitter: https://twitter.com/the_hindu Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/the_hindu/